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Can you build the ultimate Olympic machine?

We challenge you to create a better Olympian than ours from these famous athletes - can you beat us?

Consistency

Choose your ideal athlete depending on who you believe is the most consistent.

Teófilo Stevenson

Cuba | Boxing

3 gold | The hard-hitting Cuban, who refused to turn pro -- "What is a million dollars against eight million Cubans who love me?” -- went 11 years without defeat. He refused a US$5 million offer to fight Muhammad Ali and stayed an amateur. As Cuban fighter Felix Savon said: "They offered him, offered him and offered him and he did not abandon his country."

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Larisa Latynina

Soviet Union | Gymnastics

9 gold, 5 silver, 4 bronze | Thrice the floor exercise winner, a mother by the 1960 Games, she started as a young ballet dancer. "During any period in history," she once said "no matter what kind of dramatic change is happening in the world, relations between athletes were always good and human." When Michael Phelps broke her record for most Olympic medals, she came to watch him.

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Birgit Fischer

Germany | Canoe Racing

8 gold, 4 silver | "If you took part in as many Olympic Games as I did," she said, "then it’s quite difficult to pick out any highlights". Indeed, for 24 years Fischer competed at the Games, winning golds in six different Olympics. The girl who started rowing at six won her last gold at 42. Imagine her medal haul if East Germany hadn’t boycotted the 1984 Olympics.

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ROHIT'S CHOICE

Larissa Latynina: The supple queen of the Games also won as a mother.

Rohit Brinjath

Senior Correspondent

DETERMINATION

Choose your ideal athlete depending on who you believe has the most determination.

Emil Zátopek

Czech Republic | Long-distance running

4 gold, 1 silver | Having won the 10,000m in 1952 and also the 5,000m, Zatopek learned that his wife Dana had won the javelin gold. "At present," he laughed "the score in the contest of the Zatopek family is 2-1. It is too close". So he entered the marathon. He has never run it before. Of course he won. Even while talking to spectators along the way.

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Carl Lewis

US | Track and field

9 gold, 1 silver | In 1996, at his last Games, Lewis was 35. In the long jump qualifying he was in 15th place (12 qualified) and on his final jump qualified in first place. In the final, he produced his best jump in four years (8.50m) and collected sand in a bag to take home. Wrote Sports Illustrated: "It was quite possibly his most impossible moment in an impossibly brilliant career."

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Wilma Rudolph

US | Track and field

3 gold, 1 bronze | She was born premature. As a kid she got scarlet fever and with it double pneumonia. Later she had measles. Her left leg got paralysed. She wore a brace. Then an orthoapedic shoe. And then, as the New York Times wrote, one day before her 100m in Rome, she twisted her ankle. But nothing could stop Rudolph, who once said: “I don’t know why I run so fast.”

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ROHIT'S CHOICE

Zatopek: He ran his first marathon ever at an Olympics and he won it? Incredible.

Rohit Brinjath

Senior Correspondent

POWER

Choose your ideal athlete depending on who you believe is the most powerful.

Aleksandr Karelin

Soviet Union/Russia | Greco-Roman wrestling

3 gold, 1 silver | Known as The Experiment, this super-heavyweight champion once won a world championship despite broken ribs. He weighed 15 pounds (6.8kg) at birth and once reportedly lifted a huge fridge and carried it up eight floors to his flat. One of his opponents described being in the ring with him as "wrestling King Kong".

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Vasily Alekseyev

Soviet Union | Weightlifting

2 gold | The son of a lumberjack was chopping down trees and tossing logs for exercise when he was just 12 years old. Rumour has it that he ate 26-egg omelettes. Weighing over 136kg, he won the 1972 gold by 30kg and the 1976 gold by a massive 35kg.

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Steven Redgrave

Britain | Rowing

5 gold, 1 bronze | In 1997, fatigued by diabetes, he struggled in training. He found a single rowing stroke "mentally and physical painful" and needed all his willpower to push down on his cycle pedal. Yet when he had a puncture and his coach said put the bike in the van and get in, he kept pushing. Three years later he won his fifth gold.

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ROHIT'S CHOICE

Karelin. The wrestler illustrated his power by going undefeated for 13 years.

Rohit Brinjath

Senior Correspondent

PRECISION

Choose your ideal athlete depending on who you believe has the best precision.

Nadia Comăneci

Romania | Gymnastics

5 gold, 3 silver, 1 bronze | The person in charge of scoring devices in 1976 was told a 10.00 in gymnastics was impossible. So room was left for only three digits. When Comaneci finished on the uneven bars the score showed as 1.00. She was too perfect for the scoreboard. By the end of that Olympics, having changed the face of gymnastics, she had earned seven perfect 10s.

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Greg Louganis

US | Diving

4 gold, 1 silver | In 1988, Louganis hit his head on the springboard and still won easily. He was brilliant even when imperfect. Called Mr Perfect by the Guardian, he is the only diver to win consecutive golds in both categories. In the 3m springboard in 1984, he won gold by 92.1 points. No wonder a writer called him the "Baryshnikov of the springboard".

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Károly Takács

Hungary | Shooter

2 gold | In 1938, in a grenade accident, Takacs injured his right hand. So in secret he learnt to shoot with his left. In 1939 he turned up at the national championships in Hungary. People thought he was there as a spectator, but instead he was a competitor. He won that event and then nine years later was Olympic champion.

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ROHIT'S CHOICE

Comaneci: All athletes chase perfection but Nadia repeatedly found it.

Rohit Brinjath

Senior Correspondent

SPEED

Choose your ideal athlete depending on who you believe has the best propensity for speed.

Michael Johnson

US | Track and field

4 gold | Most 200m sprinters, go down a distance to the 100m. Johnson went up to the 400m. In 1996, he won the 400m in Olympic record time. In the 200m he broke the world record in gold shoes and said "I am rarely shocked by my own performance. And I'm shocked." So how fast was he? After the 200m final he noted: "I stumbled (on the fourth step), did you notice?"

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Dawn Fraser

Australia | Swimming

4 gold, 4 silver | Fraser was not just faster than anyone at the Olympics she was faster more often. No woman has still won the 100m freestyle more than once. No man has won it more than twice. But Fraser, the first woman to swim that race under a minute, won it three times. Her world record in that event stood for 14 years. Not bad for an athlete with asthma.

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Usain Bolt

Jamaica | Track and field

6 gold | At the 2008 Beijing Olympics, Bolt was 90kg of blur. His stride length was 2.43m. He took 41.1 strides to finish the race. Between the 50m and 80m mark he covered every 10m in .82 of a second. He was faster than anyone in his race or any race.

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ROHIT'S CHOICE

Usain Bolt: He won races by margins that were almost absurd.

Rohit Brinjath

Senior Correspondent

ENDURANCE

Choose your ideal athlete depending on who you believe demonstrates the most endurance.

Jacqueline “Jackie” Joyner-Kersee

US | Track and Field

3 gold, 1 silver, 2 bronze | The heptathlon tests flexibility, strength, speed, stamina. It is the 100m hurdles, high jump, shot put, 200m, long jump, javelin and 800m, all crammed into two days. Winning one gold is hard. Kersee won two, and a silver, plus three long jump medals. Caitlyn Jenner, then the decathlete Bruce Jenner, said: "She’s the greatest multi-event athlete ever, man or woman."

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Paavo Nurmi

Finland | Long-distance runner

9 gold, 3 silver | In 1924, less than two hours after winning the 1,500m, he won the 5,000m. Two days later, in terrible heat, and in a race in which only 15 of 38 runners finished, he won the individual cross-country. The next day, as some runners stayed in hospital, he won the 3,000m cross-country race. "All that I am," he once said "I am because of my mind."

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Michael Phelps

US | Swimming

18 gold, 2 silver, 2 bronze | In Beijing, Phelps produced a startling feat: 17 swims, 9 days, 8 golds, 7 world records. His goggles filled with water in one race, he won another race by .01 of a second, he was watched by his President and a hundred cameras but somehow he managed the stress. No wonder when it was all done this is what he wanted to do? "Just sitting and not moving."

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ROHIT'S CHOICE

Nurmi: In a time when athletes didn't completely understand the idea of recovery, his ability to keep winning long distance races was phenomenal.

Rohit Brinjath

Senior Correspondent